GROW VEGETABLES – IN LIGHT OF THE LOOMING FOOD CRISIS


We may read about the East Africa Drought CrisisGlobal Food Crisis 2010Looming Food Crisis to hit Afghanistan and Africa First, and articles about the imminent shortage of food in the world.
But for you who are reading this post right now,
the situation is much closer to home at the vegetable stall and in a shopping mall near to where you live.

Prices are sky high.

To give you an idea of price increases of canned vegetables – between November 2011 to date I bought 7 months worth of canned vegetables to take with me when I relocated to Mwinilunga. In November each can of vegetables cost R6.69 (that’s approx. 77c (USD). Today, 12 months later, the same can of vegetables costs R11.99. That is a R5.30 increase within a year(approx. USD1.39).

This is just one commodity. Purchase organically grown vegetables and the price escalates.

This blog is about growing your own vegetables.

I will provide you with three excellent vegetable growing models to do so from which you may choose.

The idea is to get you growing a nutritious resource in your back yard, or in strategically placed pots in your apartment or on the balcony. If you are blessed with a half acre or some hectares, even better.

Not only would I encourage you to begin growing your own vegetables for personal consumption – but the idea is also to create an opportunity for you to engage in community projects. I am greatly inspired by the Elkhart County Grassroots Hub, a blog that was introduced to me when I first started blogging myself. PLEASE visit this blog. There are wonderful related articles such as:

Let us not sit back and bewail rising prices.

Buy the best seed possible – ensure it is not contaminated

When we do begin to plant, let us do so with the best vegetable seed possible. Seed that has no trace of insecticide or pesticide, or has been organically modified in any way. It is essential – no…let me rather say, it is absolutely essential to read the small print on every packet of seed we buy. I guarantee without fear of contradiction, that the seed you buy has been treated with either insecticide or pesticides. Please read, “The Danger of Pesticides on Humans,” to gain a fuller understanding of this problem.

in 2011 I planned to relocate from Johannesburg to Mwinilunga, Zambia. The idea was to train poor subsistence farmers in the three models of farming being highlighted in this blog. The question was, where to purchase uncontaminated seed? Especially non-genetically modified seed?

Fortunately, during a visit to the Kensington Public Library near Rhodes Park in Johannesburg (South Africa), I met Tony Lopes, a permaculture vegetable gardener. He was been given permission to showcase this model of planting in the library grounds.

In discussion with him about where to source non-genetically modified seed he told me about a company called, Living Seeds. I’ve since learned about Seed Savers Exchange as well. These companies provide an inestimable service, ensuring that the vegetables you grow are insecticide and pesticide free – and that you remain healthy.

Read the small print
Next time you want to grow vegetables, read the small print, then do the right thing.

It’s time to act.

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see also:

http://www.facebook.com/colleen werth
http://www.werthworx.wozaonline.co.za
http://www.backthewaywecame.wordpress.com

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Categories: Agriculture, Anthills, Farming, Fertiliser, Food, Food crisis, God, Growing, Land, manure, Preparation, Soil, Title Deeds, Vegetables, Warning | Leave a comment

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