Produce

GROWING VEGETABLES – NATURE’S WAY TO WEALTH

WHAT?

No need to rest your garden in winter?

No need for crop rotation?

Your garden virtually looks after itself? 
AND  produces many times more than other growing methods,
PLUS it regenerates itself year after year, all by itself?

No pests  in your vegetable patch?

Virtually no weeds?

No digging your vegetable garden?

Your vegetable patch needs very little water?

Surely not.

Oh! yes, it is true.

The Food4Wealth’s special planting arrangement mimics nature on the same principle as one finds in a forest.

The forest does not plough, nor does it burn.
Where the leaves and branches fall, that is where they lie.

And in the carpet that forms in the forest, aerobic and anaerobic microbes set to work.
Nature has had these things under control for millions of years.
It’s only humans who have made things more complicated.
 

In the same way, ecological vegetable gardening provides interdependent relationships
between the living components.

These relationships mutually benefit the various components,
so the vegetable garden actually runs all by itself.
because the Food4Wealth vegetable plot is a natural ecosystem. 

Regular harvesting maintains the ideal vegetation balance required to run the garden like a natural ecosystem. 

It’s the ultimate win-win situation.  

Harvesting is good for people, but it’s also good for the garden. 

The biggest challenge that faces modern vegetable growing,
is to incorporate –

pest ecology
plant ecology
soil ecology, and
crop management
into a method that is reliable and efficient.

Until now this has never been achieved.
BUT!
The Food4Wealth method naturally combines all of these factors without any effort. 

Most of us don’t have much time to spend in the garden.  Jonathan White only invests around eight hours per year to growing his food, and although he lives on a small farm, he only uses a space of around 6m x 6m.  That’s an area that could fit into many suburban backyards several times over. 

Jonathan’s vegetable garden

The most wonderful thing about this method is that he knows he can ignore his vegetable garden for months and it won’t miss a beat. 

So, if you believe growing food is only for tough, bearded warriors with a lot of time – think again.  

ECOLOGICAL gardening is JUST the thing for YOU.

Categories: Agriculture, ecology, Farming, Food, Food crisis, Food security, Growing, healthy, Low maintenance, maintenance, Nutriets, Organic, Plant, Produce, seedlings, seeds, Self-seeding, Vegetable gardener, Vegetables, Veggie garden, Wealth, Zero tillage | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

GROWING VEGETABLES – eBOOK AND VIDEO PACKAGE

WHAT WILL YOU GET WHEN YOU PURCHASE THE FOOD4WEALTH eBOOK AND VIDEO PACKAGE?

  1. Firstly, Food4Wealth is a sustainable, ecological vegetable growing model, professionally produced by the environmental scientist, Jonathan White
  2. It is extremely easy to read and easy to understand.
  3. The Food4Wealth model will show you how to setup your own organic food garden completely.
  4. You will be taken through the entire process of growing your own vegetables in in a very small amount of space – for just a few hours effort. 
    • His Food4Wealth ebook contains 80 pages
    • and 60 minutes of videos.

The Key Principles of the Ecological Gardening Method

  1. Plant densely
  2. Plant a diversity of plants within a given area
  3. Get a good composting system set up and use the compost as a surface mulch on bare patches
  4. Allow some plants to go to seed
  5. Only interfere with the system when a single species of plant over-dominates and simply scratch out excess plants when they are small. 

His vegetable growing package also includes:

    • project plans
    • checklists
    • a maintenance plan
    • materials list
    • provides detailed tips, tricks and techniques to grow organic food successfully 
    • email support with all replies sent within 24 hours.

FREE REPORT:  “What is ecological gardening?” click here.

TO
PURCHASE
YOUR VERY OWN
eBOOK and SET OF VIDEOS
CLICK HERE.

Categories: Affordability, Agriculture, Bare patches, ecology, Economical, Farming, Food, Food crisis, Food security, Growing, Increased yields, Low maintenance, manure, Mulch, Nutriets, Organic, Pest, Plant, plants, Preparation, Produce, Save money, seedlings, seeds, Self-seeding, Vegetable gardener, Weeds, Zero Chemicals, Zero tillage | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

GROWING VEGETABLES FOR THE LESS FORTUNATE

“WHO IS MY NEIGHBOUR?”

One of SUCCESSFUL GARDENING PROJECTS’ aims is to encourage us all to think not only of ourselves, but of our neighbours and those in need.

Elkhart County (USA) are doing exactly this.

May the reblog of their August post spur you and whatever group you are part of, to do something similar in your own community

Elkhart County Grassroots Hub

Helping hands come in all shapes and sizes.

Elkhart County’s community gardens bring people together of all ages and from every walk of life. You DON’T have to be an experienced gardener to be of assistance. One woman who picked beans last night told me that she had never before picked a bean in her life. But, she said she likes how working in the garden makes her feel. “This feeds people here in our community,” she explains. “We can get a little sweaty and dirty for someone else. Giving back is a good thing.”

‘Seed to Feed’s’ coordinator, Dave Hochstetler, says that the vegetables are coming in so plentifully that “Seed to Feed” needs 30 pickers each time: Mondays at 9 a.m., Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Tell your churches, tell your clubs, tell your families. Great group project. Call Dave for details: 574-349-4905 or dhhooch@aol.com .

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Categories: Agriculture, Blessing, Commitment, Community, Donate, Farming, Food, Food crisis, Food security, God, Growing, healthy, Helping, Less fortunate, Neighbours, Plant, Poor, Produce, seedlings, seeds, Soil, Time, Vegetable gardener, Vegetables, Veggie garden | Leave a comment

VEGETABLE GROWING – KEEP THE SOIL “ON THE GROUND”

Soil erosion

Is your vegetable garden’s soil frittering away through soil erosion?

Here is a shocking statistic – though soil erosion is a natural process, human activity accelerates soil loss up to 24 billion tonnes every year. [1]

This is even more concerning, especially as topsoil contains most of the soil’s nutrients and organic matter. As one author put it, “Soil erosion: it can run away with your farm.” [3] (or even your vegetable patch!)

Add to this, wind, and the speed at which rain drops hit the earth (4.5 to 19 mph), can you afford to turn your hand at vegetable gardening or farming if the soil just won’t lie down?

HOW TO KEEP THE SOIL IN YOUR GARDEN – ON THE GROUND

The short answer is – mulch your vegetable garden . (You knew that, didn’t you.)

But here is something you may not know – don’t dig over your soil.
You’re probably wondering,
“If I don’t dig over the soil, how will I plant the seed/seedlings?”

To answer this question let me first tell you about two microbial life forms in your vegetable patch:
1. Aerobic microherd – these are all microbes that absolutely need oxygen in order to survive.
2. Anaerobic microherd – these are all microbes that don’t need oxygen to survive, but may or may not use oxygen in their life cycles.

If you dig over the soil in your vegetable garden, the microbes assigned their place in life will be turned upside down, and will die. Aerobic and anaerobic microbes are there to help you grow your vegetables to their optimum potential by improving he soil’s health and texture.

Consequence of digging over your garden?
Bang! goes your attempt at growing vegetables.

The answer?
Don’t plough, don’t overturn the soil like our predecessors taught us.

Here’s what you do:

  • You dig only where you will place the seed or seedling – click here to see how it is done.

Mulching
I had a wonderful time in Mwinilunga (Zambia’s North West Province). In 2009 Chief Kanyama invited me to train 36 villagers in the Farming God’s Way method (or, Foundations for Farming). They had never heard of mulching. But as soon as they understood the value of retaining moisture and keeping the ground “on the ground,” they set to it with vigour, collecting straw and old maize stalks to cover the land. They are now reaping harvests not heard of in their farming history.

The Benefits of Mulching[4]
• Mulching is essential to the survival of your landscape during a drought. Mulch will reduce the amount of water that evaporates from your soil, greatly reducing your need to water your vegetable plants.

• …improves the quality of your soil by breaking up clay and allowing better water and air movement through the soil. Mulch provides nutrients to sandy soil and improves its ability to hold water.

• …acts as an insulating layer on top of soil, keeping it cooler in the summer.

• …keeps weeds down, and the weeds that do grow are much easier to pull.

So! Are you ready to grow vegetables successfully?

Let me know how this has made a difference to the health of your vegetables.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Acknowledgements

[1] http://www.envirothon.org/pdf/CG/using_the_USLE.pdf

[2] http://www2.kenyon.edu/projects/farmschool/types/soil.htmhttps://www.google.co.za/#hl=en&sclient=psy-ab&q=speed+at+which+rain+hits+the+soil&oq=speed+at+which+rain+hits+the+soil&gs_l

[3] http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/organic/2002114848008095.html

[4] http://www.ccwater.com/files/Drought101Mulch.pdf

Categories: Agriculture, ecology, Farming, Food, Food crisis, Food security, Growing, healthy, Increased yields, Mulch, Nutriets, Organic, Organic matter, Plant, plants, Preparation, Produce, Rain, seedlings, seeds, Self-seeding, Soil, Vegetable gardener, Vegetables, Veggie garden, Wind, Zero tillage | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

GROWING VEGETABLES – THE “COMPANION PLANTING” WAY

Margaret Roberts’ passion for growing vegetables and herbs is clearly evident in the way she writes in her book titled, “Companion Planting.”

Each herb and vegetable is introduced with a short history of the plant, its culinary, medicinal and pest repellent properties. She has trialed each and every entry in her many books, and pioneered organic methods before the word “organic” was ever coined.

There is so much to garner from her books.

The first book I bought I gave to a Chief in Kanyama, Mwinilunga District, Zambia. I could not do without my own copy for along, so, I bought another copy – and was robbed!.

So I bought a third copy.

As you can tell, I am passionate about growing vegetables the Companion Planting way. There is much information to be culled from it. For instance, I set up two Excel schedules: one reflected the medicinal properties of the herbs and the ailments it can either relieve or cure. The other dealt with herbs that could control pests.

Margaret Roberts also provides recipes for sprays to protect your vegetables and herbs, and provides references to herbs that break down compost.

In her book, “The Essential Margaret Roberts, my 100 Favourite herbs,” she outlines how to plan a herb garden, propagation of vegetables plants, and much-much more.

For more information on Margaret Roberts Herbal Centre, click here.

Categories: Agriculture, Companion planting, ecology, Farming, Food, Food security, Green manure, healthy, manure, Nutriets, Organic, Pest, Plant, plants, Preparation, Produce, Save money, seedlings, seeds, Self-seeding, Soil, Vegetables, Weeds | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

WHAT IS “FARMING GOD’S WAY”?

Farming God’s Way, as the middle word attests, is a farming model unashamedly based on biblical as well as practical principles, like no other.

No burning/ploughing
It overturns the idea that one has to plough the land and burn the old maize stalks and bean vines.

Debunks the myths of poverty
On another level, the biblical training addresses the myths of poverty. Those who have implemented Farming God’s Way confirm that, not only does Farming God’s Way work (agriculturally), but it has set them free to prosper.

Soil improvement
By addressing the consequences of ploughing and burning the fields, farmers mindsets are challenged to implement zero tillage, mulching, and composting.

Click here to read more: BROCHURE.

Categories: Agriculture, ecology, Farming, Food, Food security, God, Growing, Land, Organic, Plant, Preparation, Produce, Soil, Vegetables, Zero tillage | Leave a comment

GROWING VEGETABLES – A SUCCESS STORY (cont’d)

Clearing a field in Kanyamaland

Later, after I had shared with him about Farming God’s way while we sat under a thatched gazebo he kept repeating something to his retainer (assistant) in the Lunda dialect.

I noticed there was a hint of tears in his eyes. His retainer turned to me and translated: “The Chief says he’s overwhelmed. He’s overwhelmed…overwhelmed!

Apparently over a period of six years the Chief had promises from two guys who had offered to train his villagers in Farming God’s Way, but they had failed to follow through on their promises. Now here before him was an “old” lady who had come all the way from South Africa – whom he did not know – who was available and offering to do the job. 

2010/2011

A fall in February 2010 in which my collarbone and thumb broke meant I could not return in May 2010 to follow up on the training with Chief Kanyama’s villagers. This was particularly disheartening as the accident set the five-year oversight programme back a full year.  But by July 2011 my passion (and the Lord’s) to settle in Mwinilunga could no longer be delayed, and by 15 December 2011 I was on my way, lock, stock and barrel (the saga is recounted in http://backthewaywecame.wordpress.com/).

Sadly, all communication was lost between Chief Kanyama and myself between 2009 and 2011due to consistent cell phone and internet network failure, and miscommunication at other times, via an intermediary.

2012

It was therefore only in June 2012 that I learned of the “first in a lifetime” abundant harvests being reaped in Chief Kanyama’s Kingdom as a result of implementing the training they had received – Farming God’s Way . A staff member at Keepers International, a civil engineer working on a hydro project in Kanyama Kingdom, the District Commissioner and members of the Department of Agriculture in Mwinilunga were all equally amazed at the results of this training.

This truly is a success story and validates the belief that Farming God’s Way is the way to go when training the poor. Not only that they may have food to eat, but they will learn to run their farms as a business to enable them to send their children to school, build homes for their families, afford medical treatment, and much, much more.

For further information about Farming God’s Way, click on this link – FGW

Categories: Agriculture, ecology, Farming, Farming God's Way, Food, God, Growing, healthy, Land, manure, Nutriets, Plant, Preparation, Produce, Soil, Vegetables, Zero tillage | Leave a comment

GROWING VEGETABLES – A SUCCESS STORY (Part 1)

Maize fields

JULY 2009

(Farming God’s Way)

Double harvests in Chief Kanyama’s kingdom

“You should meet Chief Kanyama”, said my friend, Vincent when I told him about Farming God’s Way. “I’m sure he would want to hear about your program. But unfortunately, he’s already left the boma” [village].

What a pity, I thought. To train a chief and the poor in his village would be just the environment in which to showcase the effectiveness of the Farming God’s Way model of cropping. Disappointed that I had missed him I decided to take walk in the warm July sun, and directed my steps to the KwaKuwahi Lodge situated on the banks of the Lunga River.

Later, on my return to the boma, while thirstily downing two orange Fanta drinks one after the other on the Lido Restaurant verandah , I noticed four men approaching as if to pass by. They looked like an interesting group so I called out to them, and we spent some time chatting awhile. Just as they were about to go on their way a black Pajero drew up at the steps of the Lido’s veranda. Out of the vehicle stepped a tall, well-built Zambian man dressed in an orange-white-and-black Hawaian-type shirt, black trousers, and wearing a black cowboy hat.

“That’s Chief Kanyama”, whispered one of the four men, in hushed tones.

“Chief Kanyama!” I squeaked. “Are you sure?”

“Yes, he replied.”

Like a star-struck teenager I dashed up the stairs after him, and hearing my footsteps he turned to see who was behind him.

“Are you Chief Kanyama?” I asked. “Yes,” he replied, hesitantly, a bit bemused. I quickly introduced myself to him and asked whether he would be available that day, as I would like to tell him about Farming God’s Way. And graciously he agreed to a 16h30 appointment.

Later, after I had shared with him about Farming God’s way while we sat under a thatched gazebo he kept repeating something to his retainer (assistant) in the Lunda dialect (continue here).

Categories: Agriculture, ecology, Farming, Farming God's Way, Food, God, Growing, Land, Plant, plants, Poor, Produce, Vegetables | Leave a comment

GROWING VEGETABLES – BLOOD AND BONE IN THE COMPOST?

When I first heard  of adding a blood and bone meal to add to one’s compost I mentally gagged at the thought of what it may do to the vegetables I wanted to grow? We’ve all heard at one time or another that blood can become contaminated. How then can it be dug into our compost? The health implications made me shudder.

But I later learned that the blood is not used before it is dried, and the mixture of blood and bone is put through a steaming process to clean it. One can be assured then, that what you buy at the butchery is safe. I would, however, not recommend buying it from a butchery in a rural area where steaming facilities are not available. So there is no threat to one’s vegetable patch.

Because of its nitrogen fixing properties and its calcium and phosphorous nutrients. blood and bone mix is excellent for mixing into compost which will later be added to the soil in your vegetable garden. I would recommend, however, that you first have the soil tested for nutrient content. You don’t’ want, for instance, to have too much, for instance, as it will affect your vegetables and they may even die off.

The good news is – bone and blood m eliminates the need to buy fertilizer, and is probably cheaper.

The bottom line is – how can you best improve the soil in your vegetable garden AND save money? I can recommend Jonathan White’s article on composting. Here is an extract from his article on composting  –

“Do you consider composting as just another way to dispose of unwanted vegetable waste, pruned branches, twigs, grass and leaves? Whilst this may be a valid solution to deal with rubbish, composting can be valuable option when used in the right way.

“For instance, compost builds valuable nutrients that will feed the soil in which you grow vegetables that will in turn one day, feed you and your family.  I only use compost on my vegetable gardens.  Manage your vegetable garden using compost, and it will become an integral part of the whole food production system.  Creating compost is a way to collect nutrients in one form – waste – to turn it into another form – food.

“Most people throw away what is left over after preparing vegetables for a meal. In other words, they buy X amount of nutrients, take what they need for the moment, and discard the rest. That’s like throwing Dollars into the rubbish bin.

To “raise capital” on the discarded parts of the vegetables, put this “capital” to work in your vegetable garden. That way the nutrients will be used again and again without any cost to you.

“What a way to save money!

“Put differently:
Composting creates a nutrient cycle on our property.

“We are part of that cycle because we consume the nutrients when they are, for a brief time, in a useful form.  Then the discarded portion returns to the compost to slowly make their way into another useful form – then we consume them again.

“This cycle can continue indefinitely. Of course, some nutrients you will never see again. But with diligence you will be surprised how much compost you can create to generate more nutrients than you can recycle.

“My composting system is large because I have a few large vegetable gardens. I believe that the size of your vegetable garden should be determined by how much compost you can create, and not merely by the amount of space you have in your backyard.

“To run a rich, high yielding vegetable garden you need to have some sort of soil conditioning plan, and the best thing for your soil is a generous layer of good compost on the surface a few times per year. “

To read more, click on this link, COMPOSTING.

Categories: Agriculture, Blood and bone mix, Compost, ecology, Farming, Food, Food crisis, Food security, Growing, Mulch, Organic, Organic matter, Plant, Produce, seedlings, seeds, Self-seeding, Soil, Vegetable gardener, Vegetables, Veggie garden, Zero tillage | Leave a comment

ARE THERE PROBLEMS WITH TRADITIONAL VEGETABLE GARDENING?

PROBLEMS NEED SOLUTIONS

  • Traditional vegetable gardens require an enormous amount of hard work.
    It takes a lot of time, dedication and a year-round commitment
    to grow your own food the traditional way.
  • Then there are bare patches in your patch.
    To an ecologist, this is a niche space for colonizers …
    weeds…that deprive your vegetables of nutrients.
  • Not only do they deplete nutrients, but, it takes too much time
    to attend to weeding when you could be doing something else

HOWEVER, THERE IS A SOLUTION!

We must use a technique that combines –

PEST,  PLANT & SOIL ecology plus CROP MANAGEMENT into a method that addresses the causes of these problems. 

The technique must be efficient enough to be economically viable,
and produce enough food, per given area, to compete against traditional techniques. 

 

Jonathan White, an environmental scientist has been testing an ecologically-based method of growing food for several years.  This method promotes

  • zero tillage
  • zero chemicals
  • has minimal weeds, and
  • requires a fraction of the physical attention (when compared to traditional vegetable gardening).
  • It also produces several times more, per given area, and
  • provides food every single day of the year.

 

His ecologically-based garden mimics nature in such a way that the garden

  • looks and acts like a natural ecosystem.
  • Succession layering of plants (just as we see in natural ecosystems) offers natural pest management.
  • It also naturally eliminates the need for crop rotation
  • Naturally eliminates the need resting beds
  • Naturally eliminates the need for green manure crops

Soil management is addressed in a natural way – so the soil’s structure and fertility gets richer and richer, year after year.

Another benefit of this method is automatic regeneration through self-seeding. This occurs naturally as dormant seeds germinate, filling empty niche spaces with desirable plants, and not weeds.

Traditional gardeners need convincing. So here’s the deal:
This ecologically-based method requires such little human intervention you may become frustrated with not having much to do in your vegetable garden. There! I’ve said it. But it’s true. In this ecologically based method nature will take the reins, and in your experience you will find that nature’s ecological laws are one hundred per cent reliable.

This method of growing your vegetables takes away all the mysticism of being an expert.  It is so simple, any person, under any conditions, can do it.  

THIS LEADER IN VEGETABLE

GARDENING

…produces many times more food with a fraction of the effort.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
FOR THE
UNEMPLOYED

In May 2011 fin24 reported: “South Africa’s latest unemployment figure [is the highest among] 61 [countries] surveyed by Bloomberg.”http://www.fin24.com/Economy/SA-unemployment-rate-among-worlds-highest-20110504

Despite this news, South Africa’s unemployed have a window of opportunity.
THEY CAN OBTAIN LAND

– AT NO COST –

from their rural authorities on which to grow their own vegetables; land that can turn their joblessness into a business opportunity to break the back of grinding poverty.

Should you choose to donate your Food4Wealth order to a worthy cause in South Africa or elsewhere,

YOUR PURCHASE

will kick-start a walk to freedom

for these “captives of unemployment”

DOUBLE BLESSING

TWO RECIPIENTS will benefit from A SINGLE PURCHASE

yourself, (or your beneficiary)
WerthWorx will receive a commission for referring the product.
(This will support their work among the poor in Mwinilunga , Zambia)
(see
http://www.werthworx.wozaonline.com )

TO PURCHASE

Click the link below to order via Clickbank

http://faa27-lv23t-l99gbijd3p0p5x.hop.clickbank.net/

 (Clickbank  tracks all Food4Wealth activity on the Web,
handles all payment processing, affiliate management and their payouts).

Download and print this FREE pamphlet on time-saving vegetable growing by clicking on the link below:

PROBLEMS WITH TRADITIONAL VEGGIE GARDENING

Categories: Agriculture, Bare patches, Blessing, Business opportunity, Clickbank, Commitment, Donate, Ecologist, Economical, Farming, Food, Food crisis, Green manure, Growing, healthy, Land, Nutriets, Pest, Plant, plants, Poor, Produce, rural authorities, Self-seeding, Soil, Time, Traditional gardening, Vegetables, Weeds, Zero Chemicals, Zero tillage | Leave a comment

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